Jack-of-all-Trades

My father was a very handy man.  He enjoyed working on things and constantly had some sort of project underway.  I would frequently help him work on a whole variety of things.  I was a first-class gopher.  Go-for this, go-for that.  Hand me this, hand me that.  You get the idea.  Anyway, my father would refer to himself as a jack-of-all-trades, master-of-none.  The idea being: that he dabbled, and was proficient in, a lot of areas, but did not consider himself a “master” of any of them.

As I matured, my skill-set turned out very differently from my father’s.  Oh, I know how to use a hammer, or a wrench, and I can manage some things around the house or garage, but my skills are nothing like those of my father.

I am a minister, and a teacher.  Currently, I am the pastor of a church, teach at a community college, lead a campus ministry,  am enrolled in graduate school, maintain a blog, teach ministry classes, mentor a young minister,  exercise regularly, help around the house, and try to have a life.

Perhaps I did learn something from my father.

I am not specialized, but generalized.

The problem with doing so many things is that you cannot devote as much time to any of them as you would if you were doing fewer things.  There is only so much time after all.  So the question becomes; do you continue to spread yourself around, doing what you can do, or do you reduce your commitments, and focus on doing fewer things, better?

That is a question that each one must answer for themselves.

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2 Responses to “Jack-of-all-Trades”

  1. Jonathan Stone Says:

    That’s a question I am wrestling with even now. Of course, being spread too thin can lead to poor performance or burnout. But the thing that kind of haunts me right now is the question, “What would it look like if I were focused on one thing?” Maybe that is my own self-centered desire for less stress in my life, or maybe it is the Spirit wooing me into Shabbat Shalom. I’m still wrestling. Thanks for sharing!

    • Pastor Curt Says:

      There are so many good things that we can do, but at some point “good” becomes the enemy of the “best”. We need the wisdom of God and the direction of the Holy Spirit, because God’s way may not appear to be the right way to human understanding.

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